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ISSN (online): 2076-3298
Journal Sheet: Environments
Year of the Pubblication: 2021
12
Feb
2021
Paper Submission Deadline
31
Mar
2021
Publishing Date

Add to Calendar 02/12/2021 08:00 Europe/Rome Risk Assessment for Workplace Exposure to Natural Radioactivity

Has the worldwide rush toward technological and economic developments led to a deterioration of environmental air quality? Anthropogenic air pollution, be it indoors or outdoors, is considered to be the second biggest global environmental threat after climate change. Could the urge for energy efficiency of buildings be partly responsible for the degradation of indoor air quality in terms of ionizing radiation? We know that ppeople are continuously being exposed to natural sources of ionizing radiation. Natural radiation may have numerous sources, including naturally occurring radioactive materials found in all environments. Every day, people inhale and ingest naturally occurring radionuclides from air, food, and water, which sums up 80% of the annual dose of background radiation that a person receives. Background radiation levels can vary widely due to geological differences. Radon, a naturally occurring gas emanating from rocks and soil is classified as the main source of natural radiation. Exposure to ionizing radiation, such as radon, which can occur under different circumstances, at home, at workplaces or in public places is considered existing exposure, and a decision on prevention and control should be taken. If the radiation dose is low and/or is delivered over a long period of time (low dose rate), the risk is substantially lower because there is a greater likelihood of repairing the damage. Although exposure to low doses is associated with low risk, there is still a risk of long-term effects such as cancer; however, that may appear years or even decades later if the low dose is delivered over a long period of time.
Keywords: radon; workplace dose assessment; public health; the use of IoT in exposure control; energy efficiency; temporal variability of indoor pollution; regulations on workplace exposure to radon.

Switzerland
CALL FOR PAPERS
Code: CFP-E100-SI13_2021
Posting date: 19/10/2020

Risk Assessment for Workplace Exposure to Natural Radioactivity


Aims and Scope

Has the worldwide rush toward technological and economic developments led to a deterioration of environmental air quality? Anthropogenic air pollution, be it indoors or outdoors, is considered to be the second biggest global environmental threat after climate change. Could the urge for energy efficiency of buildings be partly responsible for the degradation of indoor air quality in terms of ionizing radiation? We know that ppeople are continuously being exposed to natural sources of ionizing radiation. Natural radiation may have numerous sources, including naturally occurring radioactive materials found in all environments. Every day, people inhale and ingest naturally occurring radionuclides from air, food, and water, which sums up 80% of the annual dose of background radiation that a person receives. Background radiation levels can vary widely due to geological differences. Radon, a naturally occurring gas emanating from rocks and soil is classified as the main source of natural radiation. Exposure to ionizing radiation, such as radon, which can occur under different circumstances, at home, at workplaces or in public places is considered existing exposure, and a decision on prevention and control should be taken. If the radiation dose is low and/or is delivered over a long period of time (low dose rate), the risk is substantially lower because there is a greater likelihood of repairing the damage. Although exposure to low doses is associated with low risk, there is still a risk of long-term effects such as cancer; however, that may appear years or even decades later if the low dose is delivered over a long period of time.
Keywords: radon; workplace dose assessment; public health; the use of IoT in exposure control; energy efficiency; temporal variability of indoor pollution; regulations on workplace exposure to radon.

Languages
English
Country
Switzerland
Topics
Air Pollution, Big Data, Bioenergy, Biotechnology, Clean Technologies, Complex Systems, Data Analysis Processes, Data Management, Data Sensing and Analysis, Decision Support Systems, Development Economics, Digital Modeling, Digital Technologies, Dynamic Models, Ecology, Ecosystems, Energy Efficiency, Energy Production, Energy Retrofitting, Environmental Assessment, Environmental Impact, Environmental Pollution, Environmental Sustainability, Environmental Technologies, Food Systems, Future Developments, Green Buildings, Green Materials, Health & Wellbeing, Human-computer Interface, ICT, Indoor Environmental Quality, Industry 4.0, Innovative Materials, Innovative Technologies, Interdisciplinary Approach, Internet of Things (IoT), Machine Learning, Methodology, Modeling, Monitoring, Nanotechnology, Natural Materials, Nature-based Solutions, Performance-based Design, Process Innovation, Process Management, Process Modeling and Simulation, Public Spaces, Recycled Materials, Renewable Energy, Renewable Resources, Resilience, Risk Management, SDGs 2030, Smart Buildings, Smart Materials, Sustainability, Sustainable Construction, Sustainable Development, Sustainable Energy, Sustainable Materials, Urban Vegetation, Vegetation, Water Pollution
Review process
The Journal adopts double-blind peer review process
Indexed By

AGRICOLA (National Agricultural Library), AGRIS Agricultural Sciences and Technology (FAO), DOAJ, Emerging Sources Citation Index – Web of Science (Clarivate Analytics), Genamics JournalSeek, GeoRef (American Geosciences Institute),Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, Series and Publishers (NSD), Scopus (Elsevier) Web of Science (Clarivate Analytics), CLOCKSS (Digital Archive), e-Helvetica (Swiss National Library Digital Archive), Academic OneFile (Gale/Cengage Learning), Google Scholar J-Gate (Informatics India), ProQuest Central (ProQuest), Science In Context (Gale/Cengage Learning), WorldCat (OCLC).

APC

Info at: www.mdpi.com/journal/environments/apc

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Additional Notice from the Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Burghele Bety-Denissa