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ISSN (print): 2464-9309
ISSN (online): 2532-683X
Journal Sheet: AGATHÓN
Volume: 8
Year of the Pubblication: 2020
07
Jul
2020
Abstract Submission Deadline
20
Jul
2020
Abstract Notification of Acceptance
18
Sep
2020
Paper Submission Deadline
15
Oct
2020
Reviewed Paper Submission
30
Dec
2020
Publishing Date

Add to Calendar 07/07/2020 08:00 Europe/Rome Possible and Preferable Scenarios of a Sustainable Future | Towards 2030 and Beyond

Investigating the future is an established practice for the academy and the world of crafts and industry. From the Chicago Columbian Exhibition of 1893 to the two Worlds Fairs of New York City (1939 and 1965) and so on, the future has been foreseen as filled with technology and amazing architecture. However, not every vision of the future has described promising scenarios: the dystopian novel by George Orwell entitled Nineteen Eighty-Four, published in 1949, looked 35 years ahead, painting an anything but reassuring picture of the future. We have entered the third decade of the new millennium, and we must certainly reflect on the objectives we had set for 2020 and on the results we have achieved. However, project into the future (pro-jàcere, from Latin, jump forward), explore and imagine how your life will change, boosted by human ingenuity and with the support of science, is in the human nature. The four visions of the future proposed by Norman Henchey (1978) conceptualized in classes – ‘possible’ (any future), ‘plausible’ (future that makes sense), ‘probable’ (highly likely to happen), ‘preferable’ (the best that could happen) – have been brilliantly described in the ‘Futures Cone’ reinterpreted by Joseph Voros (2003). As we move away from the present, the ‘possible’ tends to ‘preferable’ due to the lack of elements and data on which to base the programming and the planning: in fact, the certainty on the type of technologies and production methods that will be available, on the social structure and user uses, and so on decreases.
By 2030, the world will already be different: Thomas L. Friedman (2016) highlights that the three main forces of our Planet – Moore’s Law (technology), the Market (globalization) and Mother Nature (climate change and biodiversity loss) – are all pressing at the same time, with inevitable consequences for the territory, cities, architecture, products and services that will be designed, developed and used in the future. The 17 2030 Sustainable Development Goals presented by the United Nations provide an answer for this time horizon (www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/), tracing the path towards a model to achieve a better and more sustainable future for everyone. But will these Goals be able to accelerate sustainable innovation? However, it is clear that how the future of our planet, its landscapes, cities, architecture and consumer products will mostly depend on the decisions we make today, on our level of ‘vision’ and on how we will deal with the subject of sustainability with respect to the aforementioned Goals. Going beyond 2030, imagining 2050, we will certainly have to deal with a population growth that will reach ten billion people, of which 75% will be living in cities and urban areas (United Nations, 2019); therefore, the cities of the future will become crucial metropolises for the sustainability of the whole Planet. In the meantime, the academic, crafts and industry worlds are raising a series of questions (listed in the pdf of the Call).
Based on the above-mentioned questions, AGATHÓN, turning to disciplinary areas of the Project and in particular of Landscape, Urbanism, Architecture, Engineering, Architectural Technology, Design, Restoration and Recovery, Representation, presents the subject Possible and Preferable Scenarios of a Sustainable Future – Towards 2030 and Beyond with the aim of collecting essays and critical reflections, researches and experiments, projects and actions able to give a vision of the sustainable future of Living by looking at the two-time horizons of 2030 and 2050, providing answers to the main macro-questions:
• Ecology and Environmental Quality;
• Effectiveness and Circularity in Resource Use;
• Mitigation of and Adaptation to Climate Change;
• Energy Efficiency and Renewable Sources;
• Globalization and Glocalization;
• Digitalization, Enabling Technologies and Opportunities linked to Industry 4.0;
• New Ways of Living, Working, Studying, Producing, Consuming and Socializing;
• Challenges caused by Pandemic Threats.

Italy
CALL FOR PAPERS
Code: CFP-AGA30-8_2020
Posting date: 01/08/2019

Possible and Preferable Scenarios of a Sustainable Future | Towards 2030 and Beyond


Aims and Scope

Investigating the future is an established practice for the academy and the world of crafts and industry. From the Chicago Columbian Exhibition of 1893 to the two Worlds Fairs of New York City (1939 and 1965) and so on, the future has been foreseen as filled with technology and amazing architecture. However, not every vision of the future has described promising scenarios: the dystopian novel by George Orwell entitled Nineteen Eighty-Four, published in 1949, looked 35 years ahead, painting an anything but reassuring picture of the future. We have entered the third decade of the new millennium, and we must certainly reflect on the objectives we had set for 2020 and on the results we have achieved. However, project into the future (pro-jàcere, from Latin, jump forward), explore and imagine how your life will change, boosted by human ingenuity and with the support of science, is in the human nature. The four visions of the future proposed by Norman Henchey (1978) conceptualized in classes – ‘possible’ (any future), ‘plausible’ (future that makes sense), ‘probable’ (highly likely to happen), ‘preferable’ (the best that could happen) – have been brilliantly described in the ‘Futures Cone’ reinterpreted by Joseph Voros (2003). As we move away from the present, the ‘possible’ tends to ‘preferable’ due to the lack of elements and data on which to base the programming and the planning: in fact, the certainty on the type of technologies and production methods that will be available, on the social structure and user uses, and so on decreases.
By 2030, the world will already be different: Thomas L. Friedman (2016) highlights that the three main forces of our Planet – Moore’s Law (technology), the Market (globalization) and Mother Nature (climate change and biodiversity loss) – are all pressing at the same time, with inevitable consequences for the territory, cities, architecture, products and services that will be designed, developed and used in the future. The 17 2030 Sustainable Development Goals presented by the United Nations provide an answer for this time horizon (www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/), tracing the path towards a model to achieve a better and more sustainable future for everyone. But will these Goals be able to accelerate sustainable innovation? However, it is clear that how the future of our planet, its landscapes, cities, architecture and consumer products will mostly depend on the decisions we make today, on our level of ‘vision’ and on how we will deal with the subject of sustainability with respect to the aforementioned Goals. Going beyond 2030, imagining 2050, we will certainly have to deal with a population growth that will reach ten billion people, of which 75% will be living in cities and urban areas (United Nations, 2019); therefore, the cities of the future will become crucial metropolises for the sustainability of the whole Planet. In the meantime, the academic, crafts and industry worlds are raising a series of questions (listed in the pdf of the Call).
Based on the above-mentioned questions, AGATHÓN, turning to disciplinary areas of the Project and in particular of Landscape, Urbanism, Architecture, Engineering, Architectural Technology, Design, Restoration and Recovery, Representation, presents the subject Possible and Preferable Scenarios of a Sustainable Future – Towards 2030 and Beyond with the aim of collecting essays and critical reflections, researches and experiments, projects and actions able to give a vision of the sustainable future of Living by looking at the two-time horizons of 2030 and 2050, providing answers to the main macro-questions:
• Ecology and Environmental Quality;
• Effectiveness and Circularity in Resource Use;
• Mitigation of and Adaptation to Climate Change;
• Energy Efficiency and Renewable Sources;
• Globalization and Glocalization;
• Digitalization, Enabling Technologies and Opportunities linked to Industry 4.0;
• New Ways of Living, Working, Studying, Producing, Consuming and Socializing;
• Challenges caused by Pandemic Threats.

Languages
English, Italian
Country
Italy
Topics
Architecture, Art, Artificial Intelligence, Business, Economics & Management, Civil Engineering, Ecology, Environmental & Geological Engineering, Environmental Sciences, Graphic Design, Industrial Design, Information Architecture, Materials, Nanotechnology, Sustainable Development, Sustainable Energy, Urban Studies & Planning, User Experience Design, Visual Design, Web Design
Review process
The Journal adopts double-blind peer review process
Indexed By

ANVUR, GOOGLEScholar, DOAJ, BASE, OpenAIRE, JURN, WorldCat, MIAR,  ULRICHSWEB, ICI, IP Indexing, ROAD, EZB, EBSCO, ERIH PLUS, ResearchBib, OAJI. AGATHÓN is also indexed in Digital University Library in North America, South America, Europe, Asia, Australia and Africa.

APC

The contribution for Author of a single paper is set at € 200.00. In the case of papers written by more Authors, the article publication fee will be increased by € 50.00 for each corresponding Author in addition to the first one. The fee must be paid in accordance with the directions that will be sent to Authors at the same time as the communication of acceptance of the paper for publication. Two corresponding Authors with primary affiliations based in countries defined by the World Bank as “Lower-Middle-Income Economies” are entitled to apply for a 50% discount on the normal APC.

Web Site
Submit by e-mail
redazione@agathon.it
Call webpage
Additional Notice from the Editor

To encourage the publication of contributions by Authors with primary affiliation to Universities and Research Institutions in countries defined by the World Bank as ‘low-income and lower-middle-income economies’, AGATHÓN will select a maximum of two Authors to publish their contribution for free, subject to the positive outcome of the double-blind peer review process.